Unfinished Sentences: A Collaboration to Preserve the Historical Memory of El Salvador’s Civil War

Unfinished Sentences: A Collaboration to Preserve the Historical Memory of El Salvador’s Civil War by Maggie Von Vogt is a three-part multimedia article series about the Salvadoran Civil War, the community of Arcatao, and the emergence of the Historical Memory Committee, the group that played a central role in creating an oral history and archival project to document the reminiscences of survivors and children of survivors of the conflict.

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Reportback: June 14th PSN: How Can Oral History Support Restorative Justice?

On June 14th, 2018 Groundswell: Oral History for Social Change hosted a Practitioner Support Network session with oral historian Alisa del Tufo and theater professor at Concordia University, Luis C. Sotelo Castro on how oral history supports restorative justice work.

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PSN Reportback: What is Language Justice and Why Does it Matter in Oral History Work?

In this Practitioner Support Network, oral historians Allison Corbett and Fanny Garcia explore language justice and and why it matters in doing oral history work with communities that use various languages.

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June 26 PSN Reportback: "Working for Change: Listening to Workers' Stories

The PSN centered around reflecting on lessons learned during the project “Summer for Respect: Organizing and Oral History” which was inspired by the anniversary of the Freedom Summer of 1964. Terrell was working with Columbia sociologist Adam Reich when Reich was approached by the UFCWabout working together on a project with student organizers and Walmart workers. Students were to conduct oral histories as part of their work as organizers in the field. Terrell led the oral history component and the union did the fieldwork training and organizing. Terrell started the PSN with a description of the project.

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May 31st PSN – What Are The Radical Roots of Your Oral History Practice?

On May 31st, a group of six joined PSN moderators Fernanda Espinosa and Amy Starecheski to share ideas about the radical roots of our oral history practices. The topic is part of a larger project on the radical roots of public history. Amy and Fernanda are working to collect projects with a radical perspective to include in a future publication.

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